Timbers

Embracing organic materials is a noticeable and growing trend with Australians leaning towards natural materials like solid timber and stone to help create a relaxing feel to a home. Natural materials, especially those connected with our landscape, help the occupants to relax and create more balance within their lives.
Mainland Australia is blessed with the biggest, the most beautiful and the most diverse range of hardwood timbers anywhere in the world. For the last twenty-five to thirty years Eclipse has been dedicated to elevating these timbers in the eyes and minds of Australians who have largely been unaware of this fact. The ubiquitous eucalypt trees that we all drive past in the paddocks and forests harbour so much beauty within them and what better way is there to showcase these gorgeous and interesting timbers than in a table top.

As Australian's, it's a no-brainer to have this tangible connection with our beautiful and very unique environment. 
Further to this quest of elevating Australian hardwood timbers, Eclipse has also been dedicated as much as possible to using timbers that would otherwise have been wasted such as using recycled timbers, utilising timbers from dead trees on private properties or from urban trees that have had to be legally removed. Notably, this is a step beyond sustainability. 
Many people we sell to like to see the natural features that tell 'the story' within the wood which reflects the life that the tree has had within the Australian landscape in some case for hundreds of years. They want their table to be unique, like no other table, they want the interesting natural features such as gum veins, sap pockets, and other markings from insects. All of which are typically found within many Australian eucalypts and which have been valued so poorly in the past. 

Solid Timber Information

A bit of general timber information first. When timber has just been milled from being in log form it is called ‘green’ timber which basically means it has a very high percentage of moisture content which of course, all live plants do. For timber that is likely to be used for making furniture, timber floors or stairs for example, this very high moisture content needs to be reduced considerably otherwise the item being made from it will either crack, twist or warp as the moisture leaves the internal structure of the timber. This moisture inside the cells of the timber takes up volume, as the timber loses moisture the timber size overall shrinks because that moisture is no longer there. Generally speaking expansion and contraction in timber occurs across the width of the grain far more than it occurs longitudinally and the degree to which it occurs will vary according to the actual species. On a commercial level, timber is drying is accelerated in large timber drying kilns where it is carefully and evenly dried down to industry standard which is generally between 9% to 14%.